No Comments

New Mixed-Use Project Coming To Allapattah

Coral Gables-based Coral Rock Development Group unveiled plans for Dulce Vida, a transformative mixed-use, mixed-income development in Miami’s Allapattah neighborhood. The project will add to the area’s revitalization and enhance the community’s access to affordable housing options.

Situated on a 1.3-acre site at 1785 NW 35th Street, Dulce Vida is a prime example of Florida’s new SB 102 law aimed at promoting mixed-income developments and increasing access to affordable housing. The project will consist of 200 rental units, thoughtfully designed to cater to a diverse range of residents. Of these, 85 units will be designated as affordable housing at 60% of Area Median Income (AMI), another 85 units will be allocated for workforce housing at 100% AMI, and 30 units for workforce housing at 120% AMI, ensuring a variety of housing options for different income levels.

At the heart of the Dulce Vida project is a new state-of-the-art Miami-Dade Public Library System Allapattah Branch Library, located on the ground floor. This facility will replace the existing Allapattah Branch Library currently at the site and will provide access to a modernized library with the latest library resources, technology, and specialized areas for library users of all ages.

Coral Rock Development Group is proudly partnering with Miami Bethany Community Services, a local nonprofit church deeply rooted in the Allapattah neighborhood, which will play a pivotal role in providing community outreach and involvement initiatives. They will collaborate with residents, local organizations, and businesses to ensure that Dulce Vida positively impacts the community.

“We are thrilled to introduce Dulce Vida, a transformative development that combines the crucial elements of affordable housing, community amenities, and improved access to educational resources,” said Michael Wohl, principal of Coral Rock Development Group. “This project is a testament to our commitment to creating inclusive and sustainable communities that cater to the diverse needs of Miami residents. We look forward to collaborating with the Allapattah neighborhood and Miami-Dade County to make this vision a reality.”

Designed by Behar Font & Partners, Dulce Vida will offer an extensive array of amenities including a state-of-the-art fitness center, a community lounge with a kitchenette and club room for social gatherings, a private conference room, a BBQ area for outdoor cooking and entertainment, an outdoor lounge and games area, a children’s playground, a dedicated dog park, and a parcel package room with lockers for added convenience. The project will also feature electric car charging stations, encouraging sustainable transportation options, as well as bicycle storage and repair facilities to promote eco-friendly commuting alternatives.

“Coral Rock Development Group is not investing in buildings, they are investing in people,” said Commissioner Alex Díaz de la Portilla, City of Miami Commissioner for District 1. “Dulce Vida is a significant contribution to the City of Miami’s attainable housing efforts and will provide much needed housing for low-income residents, as well as law enforcement officers, firefighters, teachers, nurses, and city employees.”

Coral Rock Development Group has particular expertise in developing multifamily workforce housing projects along with mixed-use and affordable developments. Recent projects include Pura Vida Hialeah, Kayla at Library Place, and Card Sound Key Apartments, among numerous others.

Pricing for the rental apartments will begin at $1,084 for studios, $1,161 for one-bedroom units, and $1,393 for two-bedroom units with all prices inclusive of utilities.

Groundbreaking on the project will begin in the third quarter of 2024, with a scheduled completion date at the end of 2025.

During the construction phase, the existing Miami-Dade Public Library System Allapattah Branch Library will be temporarily relocated and continue to operate in a nearby location, ensuring uninterrupted access to its services and resources for the community.

 

No Comments

Miami-Dade County Most Competitive Rental Market In U.S.

Miami-Dade County is the most competitive market for renters in the U.S., according to a recent report.

The report from rental listing website RentCafe scored 137 areas across the U.S. based on the average number of days an apartment stayed vacant, the percentage of occupied apartments, the number of prospective renters per available unit, and the lease renewal rate between the months of January and March.

Under that criteria, Miami-Dade County was ranked at No. 1 with a competitive score of 120. According to the report, apartments stayed vacant for an average of only 33 days – the shortest span of any other area in the top 20.

“Given these circumstances, a sky-high 72% of renters in [Miami-Dade] choose to stay put and renew their leases, said Esther Urmosi, communications specialist for RentCafe. “On top of that, 97.1% of apartments are already occupied here, which is above the national benchmark of 94%.”

In RentCafe’s previous report, released in March, North Jersey was named as the most competitive market in the U.S.

Ranked at No. 4 is Broward County where apartments remained vacant an average of 41 days, 95.5% of its apartments are occupied, 67.2% of its leases are renewed and 14 renters compete for each available apartment.

Palm Beach County was the No. 20 most competitive rental market where apartments stayed vacant an average of 38 days, 95% of the apartments are occupied, 11 prospective renters competing for each available apartment and there’s a 59.5% renewal rate.

Another three Florida communities made RentCafe’s top 20 most competitive market list: Southwest Florida (No. 3), Orlando (No. 8), and Tampa (No. 19).

“Developers in Florida have been busy completing new apartments. However, this is still not enough to keep up with pent-up demand, which is why Florida markets are claiming the first spots on our list,” the RentCafe report stated.

 

Source:  SFBJ

No Comments

The State Of Multifamily Investing In South Florida

South Florida’s apartment buildings have traded at record prices as rents continue to climb.

However, there will likely be fewer apartment building transactions this year compared to last year, according to a recent report from Cushman & Wakefield.

The report; authored by Calum Weaver, director of Cushman & Wakefield’s multifamily group in Florida; stated that sales volumes slowed this summer “and will likely be 20 to 30% lower than in 2021.”

That’s because higher interest rates have impacted the profitability of multifamily deals.

Despite the headwinds, multifamily sales activity remains strong as foreign and domestic buyers continue to “pour into South Florida,” Weaver said.

“Investors view it as a safe, stable, and strong asset class,” he added. “Especially compared to turbulent stock, Bitcoin, or exotic NFTs.”

South Florida’s apartment buildings traded at record highs in the first half of 2022, for an average of $345,000 a unit in Miami-Dade, $300,000 a unit in Broward, and $379,000 in Palm Beach County.

The deals add up to $4.96 billion in multifamily transactions, in “the second-highest six-month sales total in history.”

Forty-two percent of South Florida’s 367 multifamily transactions between January and July took place in Miami-Dade, while 34% were in Broward, and 24% were in Palm Beach County.

First-time investors made many of those purchases in a trend that’s expected to continue, according to the report.

Landlords’ net rental income, or effective rent, isn’t rising much as it did in 2021. But their profits continue to increase, the report stated. Over six months, rents increased 7.5% to $2,186 a month in Miami-Dade. In Broward, rent rose 5.3% to $2,326 a month during the same time.

In Palm Beach County, the rent increase was flat, with an increase of less than 1% to $2,326 a month.

It’s the first time average rents in all three counties exceeded $2,000 a month, Weaver wrote.

South Florida has led the nation in rent hikes since the pandemic as well-paid remote workers and executives moved to the region from other parts of the United States, brokers and developers have told the Business Journal.

There are signs, however, that rent increases are slowing down.

Ken H. Johnson, an economist at Florida Atlantic University, has theorized that asking rents will drop as some remote workers return to their points of origin due to employers’ demands that they spend more time in the office.

There is some anticipation that rent increases will stabilize as more apartment units are built in South Florida. A recent report from property technology company Yardi projected that 19,000 apartment units will be finished by year-end.

Weaver’s report noted that year-to-year vacancies increased in Broward to 4.4% from 3.5%. Vacancies also went up in Palm Beach County, to 6.4% from 4.5%.

However, vacancies remain “at historic lows” in Miami-Dade County, at 3%, the report stated.

As more multifamily units are built, vacancies are expected to marginally increase in South Florida.

There are now 39,216 units being constructed in South Florida, including 9,192 apartments that recently broke ground in Miami’s Brickell Financial District and downtown areas, 3,657 units in Hialeah and Miami Lakes, as well as 3,611 units in West Palm Beach, Weaver wrote.

There could be a decrease in new projects as it becomes more difficult for developers to obtain construction loans, the report noted.

But demand for rentals is expected to remain high as home prices rise in tandem with rents.

The median price for a single-family home in South Florida rose to about 13% to $542,878, the report stated, adding that “average home values are increasing at a greater rate than rents, making ownership for many even tougher.”

Meanwhile, South Florida’s population grew by 47,000 people year to date.

“This was more than the 42,842 population increase for all of 2021,” the report declared, adding that the population hike was “equally split among the three counties.”

South Florida’s population is expected to continue to grow, according to Cushman & Wakefield.

“Household formations in South Florida are expected to increase to over 37,000 each year in the next five years,” the report stated.

If half of these new households are renters, “that represents over 18,500 new renters a year in South Florida.”

Rising rents may be a boon for landlords, but they could dissuade some professionals and companies from moving to South Florida, some experts have warned.

Their costs are rising, too, as insurance cost hikes “continue to be a challenge” with premiums per unit ranging from $1,000 to $1,800 a unit, the report stated.

However, Weaver’s report noted that South Florida is home to a strong job market, with unemployment at 3% or lower and salaries increasing by 6% over the last 12 months.

 

Source:  SFBJ

 

© 2023 FIP Commercial. All rights reserved. | Site Designed by CRE-sources, Inc.